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DataBank Acquires Managed Cloud Firm Edge Hosting

Brought to you by Data Center Knowledge
DataBank, a data center provider owned by investor Digital Bridge, has made yet another acquisition. This time, it has bought Edge Hosting, a managed cloud hosting company with a focus on compliance services.
Edge CEO, Vlad Friedman, has been named DataBank’s CTO and charged with leading the quickly expanding company’s product development and technical roadmap, DataBank said in a statement.
Related: Meet Digital Bridge, a New Consolidator in the US Data Center Market
Both companies are privately owned; terms of the deal were not disclosed.
DataBank sees Edge’s capabilities to deliver compliance with standards such as FedRAMP, HIPAA/HITECH, and PCI, among others, delivered through an analytics-driven portal, as “strategic capabilities,” which it plans to scale across its footprint.
Related: DataBank Plans Wireless Tower Data Center Services for Edge Computing
Since becoming part of Digital Bridge  in July of last year, DataBank has acquired C7 Data Centers and individual data center properties in numerous secondary markets around the US, including facilities formerly owned by 365 Data Centers and Stream Data Centers. It’s also began construction of a data center in Atlanta, where it signed the Georgia Institute of Technology as the anchor tenant.
Earlier this month, DataBank announced it would sell colocation space at the locations of its sister company Vertical Bridge’s wireless towers for edge computing

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DigitalOcean Launches Drag-and-Drop Object Storage

Brought to you by Talkin’ Cloud
DigitalOcean is extending its developer-friendly portfolio to include object storage. Called Spaces, the object storage product is the company’s seventh new offering over the past 18 months.
Spaces, which is available starting at $5 per month for 250 GB of storage, features a simple drag-and-drop UI. It also works with many existing AWS S3 compatible tools.
According to DigitalOcean, it launched Spaces today in response to thousands of requests from its developer community. In a survey of developers, also released today, DigitalOcean found that 45 percent of respondents use object storage, which means there are still a lot of developers looking for a storage service.
Developers said they consider cost effectiveness, uptime, and backup capabilities the most important factors when selecting a storage service. Object storage has seen pricing pressure over the past 12 months, according to a recent report by 451 Research.
“A lot of DigitalOcean’s historic strength has been in simplifying the experience, providing a really clean developer experience out of the box,” Redmonk analyst Stephen O’Grady told Talkin’ Cloud in an interview.

Some of the most common use-cases for Spaces include hosting web assets, images and large media files, and archiving backups in the cloud.
“One of the things you end up finding, particularly as these applications grow or you want them to do different, more sophisticated things is that you begin

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Tech Firms Face Fines Unless Terrorist Material Removed in Hours

(Bloomberg) — European leaders will warn the world’s biggest technology companies that they face fines unless they meet a target of removing terrorist content from the internet within two hours of it appearing.
At a meeting in New York on the sidelines of the United Nations annual meeting, U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May, French President Emmanuel Macron and Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni will address executives from companies including Facebook Inc., Alphabet Inc.’s Google, Microsoft Corp. and Twitter Inc.
Their goal is to persuade these tech giants that stopping terrorists from using their platforms should be a priority and the focus for innovation. May’s office pointed to Twitter’s success in this area. The company said Tuesday that automated tools had helped it to suspend nearly 300,000 accounts linked to terrorism so far this year.
“Terrorist groups are aware that links to their propaganda are being removed more quickly, and are placing a greater emphasis on disseminating content at speed in order to stay ahead,” May will tell the meeting, according to her office. “Industry needs to go further and faster in automating the detection and removal of terrorist content online, and developing technological solutions which prevent it being uploaded in the first place.”
Most of the material that Islamic State puts online is aimed at radicalizing people and encouraging them to carry out attacks at home. Britain has seen four such attacks this year,

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Microsoft to Build Gas-Fueled Power Plant for Data Center in Ireland: Report

Brought to you by Data Center Knowledge
Microsoft has found itself in something of a conundrum with its data centers in Ireland. It received the necessary build permits, but now, notification comes from the country’s electric utility, EirGrid, that Microsoft might need to generate some of its own power until an upgrade to the power system in the Dublin area is completed. Evidently, Redmond doesn’t want any dead time, so it’s heeding that advice.
The story comes by way of The Irish Independent, which reports that Microsoft will be installing 16 gas-powered generators to provide up to 18 megawatts of electricity to one of its data centers, enough juice to power about 18,000 homes. A company spokesman has said that the generators will only provide temporary power to the center “if necessary.”
Related: Microsoft Moves Away from Data Center Containers
The Grange Castle Business Park in suburban Clondalkin, about 5 miles or so west of Dublin, is already home to four Microsoft data centers, as well as data centers operated by Google, Interxion, and others. Last year, Redmond received approval to build four more at the location, at an estimated cost of $1.08 billion.
Other large US-based companies operate data centers in the Dublin area as well, most notably Amazon.
Related: Latest Microsoft Data Center Design Gets Close to Unity PUE
“Space at Grange Castle Business Park is in high demand from international business customers,” the Irish

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Cloudflare Partners with Google to Give Cloud Credits to Developers

Cloudflare is funding development on its Apps Platform with up to $100,000 in Google Cloud Platform (GCP) credits through a collaboration with Google Cloud.
Early-stage developer startups may be eligible for a range of benefits under the new program, including $3,000 to $100,000 in GCP credits for one year, while some are eligible for 24/7 technical support and access to the GCP technical solutions team.
Cloudflare and venture capital investors announced the $100 million Cloudflare Developer Fund in June, when the company unveiled its Cloudflare Apps Platform. The Apps Platform is a collection of APIs allowing developers to build applications leveraging Cloudflare’s global network infrastructure.
See also: Cloudflare CEO Says Company Could Not Remain “Neutral” as it Bans Daily Stormer
The partnership enables developers to use GCP credits to host interactive elements of apps, perform advanced analytics, and use Google’s machine learning and artificial intelligence APIs to innovate Cloudflare Apps.
“We’ve been collaborating with Google for years, and working together for this initiative was a no-brainer. Now we’re working together to help drive innovation and democratize access to Internet tools that help developers and our customers accomplish things that were impossible before,” Matthew Prince, co-founder and CEO of Cloudflare said. “This is just another example of how we’re continuing to find new and collaborative ways to encourage app

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The U.S. Kaspersky Ban Sets an Ugly Precedent

(Bloomberg View) — Is the U.S. government’s ban on the products of Kaspersky Lab, the Moscow-headquartered global cybersecurity company founded by Russians, a reasonable precaution or brazen protectionism? It’s possible to argue either case. But whether the ban is justified is less important in the grand scheme of things than what it does to the borderless nature of the cybersecurity industry and the tech industry as a whole.
The precautionary argument is laid out persuasively in the Department of Homeland Security statement. The DHS says that “Kaspersky anti-virus products and solutions provide broad access to files and elevated privileges on the computers on which the software is installed.” That’s undeniably true. It also says the Russian government could “request or compel assistance” from Kaspersky; that, too, is true as far as it goes: The Kremlin can put any amount of pressure on any company with sizable Russian operations, and Kaspersky is one such company.
See also: Kaspersky Lab Offers Source Code to U.S. Government
Kaspersky Lab has offered to let the U.S. inspect its source code, but any such inspection could miss backdoors, and the source code could be changed afterwards. The U.S. government could test Kaspersky’s products by putting them on a “honey server” and watching if any malicious activity ensues — but what if the Russian government is saving the Kaspersky weapon for some

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IBM to Remove Cloud Migration Hurdles with New Data Transfer Device

Brought to you by IT Pro
One of the barriers for enterprises storing data in the cloud is data migration, a process that has traditionally been slow and costly, hindered by network limitations. IBM wants to remove this barrier for its customers with a new cloud migration solution designed for moving massive amounts of data to the cloud.
IBM Cloud Mass Data Migration is a shippable storage device, which offers 120 TB and uses AES 256-bit encryption. The device also uses RAID-6 to ensure data integrity, and is shock-proof. The device is a flat-rate, and includes overnight round-trip shipping.
The device is about the size of a suitcase, and has wheels so it can be easily moved around a data center, Michael Fork, distinguished engineer and director, cloud infrastructure, IBM Watson and cloud platform said. Fork said that the solution allows customers to migrate 120 TB in seven days.
“When you actually look at the networking aspects of this, for example if you were to transfer 120TB over a 100 Mbps internet connection, that would take 100 or more days,” he said.

Similar options on the market include the AWS Snowball Edge, which was launched last year and offers 100 TB of usable storage capacity. In June, Google introduced Transfer Appliance, which offers up to 480TB in 4U or 100TB in 2U of raw data capacity.
“Previously we supported two main transfer methods. One was an IBM solution called IBM Data Transfer service, and this allows you to ship us a USB hard drive or

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How Serious is VMware About Open Source?

Brought to you by Data Center Knowledge
Media pundits everywhere seemed to be filled with surprise Wednesday, when VMware’s CEO and CTO were both singing praises to open source at VMworld Europe in Barcelona. With open source taking over the data center, even much of the proprietary software being built on code that started as open source, I’m not sure why that’s surprising. The world’s biggest data center software company has little choice but to embrace open source if it wishes to remain that way.
“When we look at the world of open source, it is very very powerful in its ability to produce innovation and cool ideas,” VMware’s CTO Ray O’Farrell said. “But it’s not the software itself, it’s the community that builds up and is able to leverage open source.”
The “community” of which he was speaking appears to be developers rather than users, although I’m sure he’s more than happy to embrace open source users who are wanting to include VMware in their plans. He mentioned that a year ago the company created an office under his jurisdiction that’s focused on working with the developer community.
“The bottom line is, we want to engage with this community more, and this is a great way for us to contribute to it,” he said.
“One of the biggest things we want to do is open up our own product APIs and build a gilt-edged opportunity for the open source community. We

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Experts Dispute VC’s Forecast that Caused Data Center Stocks to Slump

Brought to you by Data Center Knowledge
The stocks of all seven US data center REITs (there are now six, following a merger that closed Thursday) slid down simultaneously this week, after a well-known venture capitalist and hedge-fund owner said at an investor conference that advances in processor technology will eventually lead to the demise of the data center provider industry.
But industry insiders say his views are overly simplistic, and that history has shown that advances in computing technology only create more hunger for data center capacity, not less.
Related: Alphabet Q2 2017: Enterprise Efforts Pay Off for Google Cloud
Since server chips are getting smaller and more powerful than ever, companies in the future will not need anywhere near the amount of data center space they need today, Chamath Palihapitiya, founder and CEO of the VC firm Social Capital, who last year also launched a hedge fund, said Tuesday afternoon, according to Seeking Alpha, which cited Bloomberg as the source:
Word that Google may have developed its own chip that can run 50% of its computing on 10% of the silicon has him reading that “We can literally take a rack of servers that can basically replace seven or eight data centers and park it, drive it in an RV and park it beside a data center. Plug it into some air conditioning and power and it will take those data centers out of business.”
Related: Microsoft Profit Tops Estimates as Cloud Growth Marches On
Following the event,

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Google and Facebook Fret Over Anti-Prostitution Bill’s Fallout

(Bloomberg) — Google and Facebook Inc. are among companies opposing a Senate bill aimed at squelching online trafficking of children, a stance that makes the Silicon Valley giants uneasy allies of a website accused of providing an advertising platform for teen prostitution.
The companies and tech trade groups say online providers will face greater liability for speech and videos posted by users if U.S. lawmakers move against Backpage.com and its online classified ads. Bill supporters disagree, saying the measure creates a narrow exception to deter lawbreakers and won’t harm the internet.
“There’s clearly a problem” as victims of sex trafficking advertised on Backpage repeatedly lose before judges who cite the federal immunity, said Yiota Souras, general counsel for the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, a non-profit group. “Time and again victims are getting kicked out of court, even though there’s trafficking going on.”
See also: Cloudflare CEO Says Company Could Not Remain “Neutral” as it Bans Daily Stormer
The tech companies say they agree with the purpose of the law, but fear the unintended consequences. They want to preserve immunity they won from Congress two decades ago, after the brokerage dramatized in the film “The Wolf of Wall Street” sued an online service over critical comments posted on message boards.
Now at least 28 U.S. senators have signed onto the effort to retract some of that protection granted during the

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